Conservation justice in metropolitan Cape Town: A study at the Macassar Dunes Conservation Area

J. Stephen Ferketic, Andrew M. Latimer, John A. Silander

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Conservation justice, a concept analogous to environmental justice, suggests that local communities are entitled to receive fair treatment and meaningful involvement in the development and implementation of conservation policy. In this study, of an urban conservation project in Cape Town, South Africa, we contribute to the ongoing conversation about the importance of community-based conservation approaches. Conservationists must work to plan and implement projects in ways that are not only acceptable to stakeholders, but inspire local community involvement in achieving conservation goals. Given its location in the impoverished Cape Flats region of metropolitan Cape Town and its unique ecological and conservation value, the Macassar Dunes Conservation Area warrants a conservation justice approach. We conducted semi-structured interviews with members of interested and affected communities, then analyzed stakeholder perspectives on biodiversity protection, fencing, and informal housing. The results suggest that despite disparity among groups in needs and perspectives, conservation projects have potential to deliver tangible benefits to all stakeholder groups. A belief in conservation is universal across stakeholder lines, but contrasting needs and perspectives of the studied groups lead to conflicting views on important issues of implementation. An understanding of different stakeholder groups' specific needs and interests is therefore essential for successful implementation of sustainable urban conservation projects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1168-1174
Number of pages7
JournalBiological Conservation
Volume143
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 1 2010

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dunes
towns
stakeholders
dune
protected area
conservation areas
stakeholder
community service
interviews
South Africa
social justice
justice
biodiversity
environmental justice
project

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Nature and Landscape Conservation

Cite this

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Conservation justice in metropolitan Cape Town : A study at the Macassar Dunes Conservation Area. / Ferketic, J. Stephen; Latimer, Andrew M.; Silander, John A.

In: Biological Conservation, Vol. 143, No. 5, 01.05.2010, p. 1168-1174.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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